Kate Alexander Shaw
Research Fellow at London School of Economics

Dr Kate Alexander Shaw is a Research Officer in the European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She specialises in British and comparative political economy, with a particular interest in the politics of economic ideas. She gained her PhD in 2018 from the LSE’s Department of Government. Her doctoral work developed a theory of the life-cycle of economic policy narratives under conditions of both stability and crisis, looking particularly at the New Labour government of the UK (1997-2010).  She has previously been a visiting fellow at Brown University, and an affiliate researcher at the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI).  Kate has published on topics including income inequality in Britain, and the comparative politics of intergenerational fairness in post-crisis Europe.

Kate holds an MRes in qualitative political science research methods from the LSE, and a BA in social anthropology from the University of Cambridge. Prior to her PhD, she worked as a senior policy analyst at the Greater London Authority and at HM Treasury.

Select publications:

Alexander Shaw, K. (2019), Intergenerational Fairness in Post-Crisis Europe: A Comparative Study. Research paper for the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute and the Foundation for European Progressive Studies, November 2019

Alexander Shaw, K. (2017), Baby Boomers versus Millennials: Rhetorical conflicts and interest construction in the new politics of intergenerational fairness. Research paper for the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute and the Foundation for European Progressive Studies, December 2017

Hopkin, J. and Alexander Shaw, K. (2016) ‘Organized combat or structural advantage? The politics of inequality and the winner-take-all economy in the United Kingdom.’ Politics & Society, 44 (3). pp. 345-371.

Alexander Shaw, K. & Hopkin, J. (2015), ‘Great Britain: From New Labour to new politics’, in Tiersky, R. & Jones, E. (eds), Europe Today: A Twenty-First Century Introduction (Fifth Edition), Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield

partners
This project is funded with a Synergy Grant by the European Research Council under Grant Agreement n. 810356. Views and opinions expressed are however those of the author(s) only and do not necessarily reflect those of the European Union or the European Research Council. Neither the European Union nor the granting authority can be held responsible for them.